Zigzag Quilt- Sisterhood of Scraps

Orange Zigzag

It is finally finished. I had made the goal to share this before the first pumpkins were out and I think I made it.

  

When I asked some of my friends to join me in the Sisterhood of Scraps project, I was very honored that Barbara Brackman said YES. She shared her Orange Zig Zag antique quilt that had been on my bucket list to make. There was no time like the present to reproduce her version.

I am in love and I can cross something off my bucket list.

I am ready for the pumpkins.

Aren’t all the shirtings so yummy?

Shirtings are generally a reproduction fabric but I am seeing more and more new styles of shirtings with the popularity of low volume styles growing in popularity.

This is what I can do all day every day!

Play with Fabric

These are just a few of my lights for this quilt. I really tried to get some bold stripes, tickings and other vintage inspired pieces. I added some dots since I think 100% of the quilts I make have dots in them.

Fig Tree and Co. has the yummiest collection of fabric, All Hallow’s Eve and I was hoarding the Orange, stock #20354-11 from this collection. This fabric was the perfect piece to use for this quilt.

photo courtesy of Martingale Publishing

Barbara made a mini version of her antique quilt. Such fun!

photo courtesy of Martingale Publishing

Always support your independent book retailers by shopping there or asking them to order this book for you.

Book is also available from Martingale Publishing

Next up to reproduce from Sisterhood of Scraps is Sheryl Johnson’s quilt, Halfsquare Hashtags.

Side note: If you are a fan of Barbara like I am then you will want to be on the lookout for

Encyclopedia of Pieced Patterns and BLOCKBASE, both from Electric Quilt. 

These are available late 2020 and would be terrific Christmas gift to yourself!

Here is a  page example from the book courtesy of Electric Quilt. I own her original book and can’t wait to get my hands on this one. This book is great for designing, as a resource and historical information.

 

Thank you for following along,

-modalissa

BLockheads 3- Jen Kingwell

Wednesday Wednesday!

Today is Jen Kingwell’s turn to share a quilt block pattern. The name of her block is Proposal and it has a great story behind it. To get the pattern and learn more about the block, visit Jen’s blog, HERE.

Using Jen’s inspiration for her block, I decided to use all lights to represent a diamond.  My Diamond is not perfect and since there is all different qualities of diamonds I left the imperfections!! Another thing I learned while pulling fabric for this one is I must love white/cremes with tan or grey dots.

If you follow me on Instagram of Facebook then you probably have seen some of the pictures of my only daughter’s wedding. I wanted to share another story which seems fitting on the topic of proposals. My daughter has always been a city girl but she met and fell in love with a country boy. He proposed to her by carving the words into a tree on their land. The night he was planning on proposing she was late coming home from work which also meant she was tired and probably a little cranky. He insisted on going for a ride and he had something to show her. While she wanted to wait until the morning, but she went ahead and this is what she saw. (picture was taken in the morning)

I had help along the way.  Do you sew in your swimsuit?

So when it came time to make her a quilt for her wedding, I could think of no other pattern than a tree block.  I sent blocks out to some of their friends and family  for messages and well wishes.

I think they were pretty surprised! For a few days this was their wedding quilt, now we call it the Babymaker. No pressure!!

Just in case you are wondering I used a tutorial from Amy Smart for this block. You can find the info HERE.

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the Proposal block.

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Stay Safe my friends!

Enjoy,

-modalissa

Blockheads- Janet Clare

Today is Janet Clare’s turn on the Moda Blockheads series. Her block is very clever. I love how creative she was with the sizing of the block. To download the pattern instructions, visit Janet Clare’s blog.

I had fun making this block  and couldn’t help but be inspired by my recent trip to Alaska for my daughter’s wedding.  The whole family was secluded to one massively huge house with the most incredible view. Priceless!

Mr and Mrs Kearney

 

 

They stayed and honeymooned in Alaska and my daughter sent me this pic of a quilt shop they saw. I just had to share!

 

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the ZIG ZAG block.

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Stay Safe my friends!

Enjoy,

-modalissa

 

BH 3- Robin Pickens- 25

GIVEAWAY- CLOSED    Winner- QUILTSONG notified

Today is Robin Pickens turn to share a quilt block named

CORNER GARDEN.

It is no surprise to anyone since each of her fabric collections are based on the study of flowers that Robin’s quilt block would also be a flower. I had a lot of fun piecing this block even though my leaves are cock-eyed.

block #25

To get the pattern, visit Robin’s blog, but you may want to read a little further because the Blockheads have some other goodies in store for you.

I wanted to take a few minutes and tell you about the Moda All-Star series of books. Each book focuses on a specific Moda precut including anything from Jelly Rolls to Mini Charms to the newest Fat Quarter book. My name is on the cover of each of these books as compiled by, but the real talent is inside the pages. Each designer has made a project and their proceeds of book goes to a particular charity.  Each of the designers listed below will be giving away the featured e-book on their blockheads post today, so be sure and click on the blue link of the designers name to find out how to enter. I have also included a link to each of the books on Martingale site for more information. With each purchase of these books you are also making a contribution to a specific charity. Thank you for that!

Moda All-Stars – On a Roll – 14 Quilts That Start with 2 1/2″ Strips

 – Visit Janet Clare 

 as she shares about this book and the charity, School on Wheels.

Moda All-Stars – Mix It Up! – 16 Quilts from Cake Mix and Cupcake Mix Papers

Visit Laurie Simpson as she shares about this book and the charity, Feeding America.

Moda All-Stars – Two, Four, Six, Eight – Fat-Quarter Quilts You’ll Appreciate

Visit Vanessa Goertzen as she shares about this book and the charity, Special Olympics.

Moda All-Stars – All in a Row Again – 23 Row-by-Row Quilt Designs

Visit Stacy Iest Hsu as she shares about this book and the charity, Give Kids the World.

Moda All-Stars – Mini-Charm Quilts – 18 Clever Projects for 2-1/2″ Squares

Visit Jen Kingwell & Jan Patek as they share about this book and the charity, Lutheran Church Charities K-9 Comfort Dogs.

Moda All-Stars – Mini Marvels – 15 Little Quilts with Big Style.   

Visit Betsy Chutchian as she shares about this book and the charity, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital.

Moda All-Stars – Merry Makers – Patchwork Quilts and Projects to Celebrate the Season

Visit Lisa Bongean & Joanna Figueroa as they share about this book and the charity, Marine Toys for Tots.

Moda All-Stars – Lucky Charm Quilts – 17 Delightful Patterns for Precut 5″ Squares

Visit Brigitte Heitland as she shares about this book and the charity, Alex’s Lemonade Stand.

Moda All-Stars All in a Row – 24 Row-by-Row Quilt Designs  eBook only

Visit Corey Yoder as she shares about this book and the charity, No Kid Hungry.

Moda All-Stars – Scraps Made Simple – 15 Sensationally Scrappy Quilts from Precuts   

Visit Sherri McConnell & ME as WE share about this book and the charity, Alzheimer’s Association.

Scraps made simple includes quilts from Amy Ellis, Amy Smart, Carrie Nelson, Corey Yoder, Edyta Sitar, Jan Ragaller, Jenny Doan, Laura Boehnke, Lisa Bongean, Lisa Calle, Lynne Hagmeier, Sherri Falls, Sherri Mc Connell and Susan Ache. I have always enjoyed making scrap quilts or quilts with lots of fabrics but being a part of this book was where I got my first twinkle in my eye to do my own scrap book. Being a part of such a wonderful community of talented quilters inspires me every day.

A few of the other quilts in the book are as follows….

To enter to won an e-book of Scraps Made Simple, leave a comment telling me how many hours a week you are able to quilt, thinking about quilting does not count. I will notify the winner Friday, July 3rd.
Enjoy,
Modalissa

Blockheads- Block 23- Vanessa Goertzen

Happy Wednesday and welcome to the LUCKY PENNY block designed by Vanessa Goertzen.


 

I absolutely love this pattern and I am pretty proud of my workmanship. I took my time and enjoyed the process!

You  can  hop  on  over  to  Vanessa’s  blog  to   download  the  pattern. I am sharing just a few pictures of my process and can’t wait to see yours.

I made the 8″ block and cut the pieces and did a layout so I could make sure none of the same fabrics touched each other… and really I just loved looking at all the blue and whites together.

Just so yummy, yummy, yummy. Doug Leko’s Mini Simple Folded Corners ruler came in so handy to trim my little bitty corners.

How dynamic this block would be as an allover quilt? Lisa Bongean of Primitive Gaterings probably already has a pattern for this.

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you enjoyed my version of Vanessa’s block.

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the Lucky Penny block.

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Enjoy,

 

Blockheads- 22- Laurie Simpson

Laurie Simpson- Hen and Chicks

Block 22 is designed by Laurie Simpson. The block is named Hen and Chicks.

Download the pattern, HERE.

To read about my version and a little giveaway, keep reading along.

I have a huge fan girl crush on Laurie Simpson. Everything she touches is classic and inspiring including this weeks block.

Laurie writes in her description of her block the following, At first glance, the Hen and Chicks Block seems like another uneven 9-patch block. However, it requires a bit more sewing making this a fun but easy block. Adding 3 layers on a center square gives you many design possiblities. Mix and match fabrics and scraps, or use just 3 fabrics as pictured. So that got me to thinking of how fun this block would be as an allover quilt. So many piecing options that I played around a little bit with my block. Shown above is a repetitive block with a 1″ finished sashing and corner stones. I did not put sashing on the outside rows of the quilt so I thought it did not need a border at all carrying through the vintage feel. I rotated the blocks to create a secondary design throughout.

Squint and you can see all kinds of movement.

This looks like it could have been a vintage quilt so I did not add any borders which makes this quilt measure 53 x 62.

42 -8″ blocks set 6 across and 7 down. Of course you can make it bigger just by adding more blocks!

I love it so much!

Here is another version that is my version of Laurie’s block with 1″ finished sashing and corner stones and no other changes. I am obsessed by Laurie’s all over star print so I thought a nice big border would finish this one off nicely.

Now for the GIVEAWAY!!!

Each week I try and add a few little trinkets to my pictures. This week I added the quarantine merit badge stickers designed by Michelle White. During the past several weeks we have all been experiencing the new kind of normal and yes I have cut my own bangs 5 times and it shows. I have a couple of sets of stickers that I would like to share. Leave a comment and share one thing you learned or have tried during the pandemic and I will pick at random a few people to receive a set of stickers and a few goodies.

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the Hen & Chicks block

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Enjoy,

-Modalissa

 

Orange Zig Zag by Barbara Brackman

If you have been following along on my Sisterhood of Scraps stories, then you probably know about my love of the color Orange.

One of the Orange quilts that have been on my “MUST MAKE Pinterest Board” is this antique quilt from Barbara Brackman’s quilt collection. I was so excited when she let me include it in the Sisterhood series of books. Then comes along All Hallow’s Eve by Fig Tree and Co, and I became obsessed with the orange’s in this collection, the color is officially named pumpkin. Not too bright or not too orange….just right.
I knew I had found the perfect fabric to remake Barbara’s quilt. Stock # 20354-11 just in case you want to rush to the store to get some.

Photo courtesy of Martingale Publishing, Sisterhood of Scraps, Stock # B1501, Orange Zig Zag

Instead of using the entire collection of All Hallow’s Eve for my quilt, I decided to pull from my scraps.

This is just a sampling of some of the fabrics I pulled, and I added a few brand new ones that are coming soon.

Can you spy any fabrics you have not seen yet?

I  had to use some of the Lollies from Jen Kingwell’s collection. Lollies are an 8 in 1 fabric, and each fabric

measures approx. 5″ wide by the length of the goods. This print was from her Remix collection. When you see stuff like this, you just have to grab it.

Who knows when you are going to need it. I am glad I had it in my stash.

My version of Barbara’s quilt that is in the book was made with the majority of the fabrics

on the darker side from my collection of Lollies.

Picture Compliments of Martingale Publishing, Sisterhood of Scraps, book #B1501, Pot of Gold

So many fabric choices, and since they were all Lollies, I knew they would all match beautifully.

I can’t wait to get started on my orange version.

What is your favorite color?

Stay Tuned.

-Modalissa

 

 

BH3-20- Contribution

Blockheads 3

Todays’ block pattern is supplied by Lisa Bongean of Primitive Gatherings, and the pattern can be downloaded from her blog.

The name of the block is Contribution and I think that is such a perfect block to describe Lisa B. She is so generous to contribute her tips and techniques on how she makes everything happen.
I almost hate to share my block but I am going to.

My points are not perfect as I was working on this block during the labor day weekend.

My husband has gone crazy over the new Cheetos popcorn and insisted I give it a try.

I am not a huge fan but that does not mean I still keep a bowl of it by my machine to munch on.

No matter how many times I washed my hands or thought I licked all the cheese off my fingers,

I still got some on my block.

Fingers crossed, it will wash out.

I have been making the 8″ size and my notebook is filling up.

I love flipping through the book and seeing the progress I have made so far.

How are you coming on your blocks?

How do you keep your patterns organized?

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the CONTRIBUTION block.

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Enjoy,

 

Modalissa

BlockHeads3- Zen Chic-block 19

I have fallen a bit behind on my Blockheads blocks. Between making masks and planning a virtual quilt market there are many balls to juggle. In the pre-pandemic world, I would have just gotten home from Quilt Market. I would have been showing you all the projects I was working on with sneak peeks of what the Moda designers have new for you this fall. Excuses, Excuses, right? How are you doing? The sales of sewing machines have increased during this time which is so exciting. More people of all ages sewing whether making masks, clothing, or crafts. More MAKERS!!

Today is BLOCK 19, Compass Point designed by the uber-talented Brigitte Heitland of Zen Chic.

I had fun choosing my fabrics for some odd reason. Normally I would have made each point a different color but when I went to grab fabrics for the block the first ones on the stack were funky geometrics so I went with it.

I wanted to share this video of Brigitte in her home in Germany sharing her studio, projects, and new fabrics. Everything about it is so charming. Enjoy!

To download Brigitte’s Block, visit her blog.

 

Visit each of the designers listed below for their take on the Compass Point block:

Be sure to check out the Block Heads Facebook Group and look for Block Heads 3 on Instagram – #modablockheads and #modablockheads3.

Quilt Scrappy

Machine quilting is MAGIC, right?

What really is the hardest decision in the quilt making process is how to quilt it. Finding a quilter that can work their magic takes some time. Several of the quilts in Sisterhood of Scraps were quilted by Maggi Honeyman, so I asked her to do a post about how she goes through the process of quilting scrappy quilts.

 

When Lissa asked me to write a post about quilting scrappy quilts, I knew it was a subject that is right up my alley.  My quilt-making journey has been about scrappy quilts from the beginning.   The more fabrics that are included in one quilt top, the better!  So, when it comes to quilting them, I feel at home.  Over the 19+ years that I have been quilting on a long-arm quilting machine for other individuals, there has been a big transformation in how we approach quilting scrappy quilts.   When I started, doing an all-over repeated pattern on most quilts just wasn’t the preferred option.  This has changed recently, particularly on scrappy quilts.

 

I am a very traditional piecer and my quilting style definitely tends towards traditional patterns, whether on scrappy or more fabric specific quilts.  I always try and let the quilt suggest to me what it needs in the way of quilting when the piecer is unsure of how they want their quilt finished.  The types of fabrics or the block design are a couple of ways a quilt can talk to you.  Sometimes it takes getting the quilt loaded on the machine; and other times, the quilt speaks for itself.  Feathers and crosshatching are always great go-to-patterns for custom quilting.  For the more modern quilts, it has been a bigger stretch for me artistically.  When deciding on ideas for quilting, I will use a piece of Press-n-Seal to carefully draw on top of the quilt, which helps me visualize how my idea will actually look on the quilt.  There is also a multitude of long-arm machine quilters who have written fantastic books with design ideas, as well as internet resources, that have lots of ideas for custom quilting on all types of quilts.  These books and the internet have changed the machine quilting world immensely.

Christmas All Year- quilted by Maggi Honeyman

Having said this about custom quilting, all-over/edge to edge designs have become much more acceptable, just as machine quilting is more acceptable than it was 20 years ago.  When looking at scrappy quilts, I feel that the fabrics and the actual piecing pattern make the biggest or most important statement for a quilt.  On these quilts with so much interest in the fabrics and design, the quilting simply needs to add texture and dimension. I will pick an all-over design for scrappy quilts as often as choosing to quilt it custom.

Friendship Starter- Sisterhood of Scraps

As with scrappy quilts, I have always loved pieced backs.   My philosophy is to use what I have and that includes pieced backs. But what I really mean is if I don’t use what I have, then I can hardly justify buying more!!  So, when customers bring pieced backs, I am quite ok with that.  However, when there are lots of pieces used for the back, it is very easy for the back not to be “square”.  Careful measuring and piecing is just as important for the back as it is for the front so that you have a nice flat back.  While quilting the top, I can see when a bit of adjustment is needed and I can attend to it.  When the back has some less than square properties, it is much more difficult to see and correct while quilting.  Many of my quilts have pieced backs, as it adds another artistic element, and making quilts is very much an artistic outlet for most quilters.  When I piece my backs, if I am not using some of my leftover blocks for part of the back, I use a ½” seam allowance with a slightly shorter stitch length and then press the seams open.

The scrappy back of Friendship Starter

As far as pressing seams prior to quilting, when a piecer chooses to press the seams open, they should know that any stitch-in-the-ditch quilting is more difficult.  Also, stitching in an open seam runs the risk of cutting the piecing threads with the needle while doing the quilting.  If the seam is pressed to one side, it gives you the ditch to stitch in, which provides the stability and structure that stitch-in-the-ditch is intended to give.   Having said that, open seam allowances allow for much flatter intersections to quilt through and over.  Thicker seam allowances always benefit from very good steam/heavy pressing to ensure they are the flattest they can be.

I hope these thoughts have given you some insight into my quilting process for scrappy quilts.  Everybody has their own process, but in the end, we are all makers in one big sisterhood of quilters.  This is first, a way to relax, express ourselves, belong to a group, and have fun.  There are no hard and fast rules and there is no perfection.  Make it yours and know I truly love quilting with you!

Thanks so very much for quilting with me,

Maggi

 

Thank you Maggi for always making my quilts SING! and sharing such great tips.You can find Maggi on Facebook.

 

and Instagram @sewmaggi

 

Join me back here tomorrow as I share what Maggi has been working on lately.

 ** Sisterhood of Scraps is available NOW from your favorite book retailer.